Contagious Connections, session 2

Co-chaired by Ryan Kashnanipour (University of Arizona) and Claire Gherini (Fordham University), “Contagious Connections” looks at epidemics and disease in Vast Early America.

Epidemics were a foundational force in the early history of the Americas and the larger Atlantic World. Yet their interdisciplinary and comparative analysis has often been restricted by the imperial and temporal priorities of these regions’ subfields as well as older biomedical and demographic approaches to the study of disease. Rather than rehashing whether acquired immunity destined Native Americans to extirpation and Africans for slavery in the Americas, this series proceeds from the idea that epidemics are epistemological and ontological forces: they have a historical materiality but become epidemics of a particular disease when historical actors collectively decide to name and treat them as such.

Join the Omohundro Institute for a pair of (online) conversations with established scholars about these topics on Friday, December 3, 2021, from 11:30 am to 1:00 pm ET and Friday, December 17, 2021, from 12:30 to 2:00 pm ET.

The December 3 program will include Pablo Gomez, Paul Kelton, Mark Goldberg, Martha Few, Erik Seeman, and Philippa Koch.

The December 17 program will include Erica Charters, James Rice, Cristobal Silva, Rana Hogarth, and Seth Archer.

About the December 17 panel

Erica Charters is a historian of disease, war, and empires.  She is associate professor of Global History and the History of Medicine at the University of Oxford, where she is also Director of Oxford’s Centre for the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, and co-Director of Oxford’s Centre for Global History.  She has published on the history of colonial medicine as well as the history of imperial war and its relationship to disease.  Her publications include the monograph Disease, War, and the Imperial State and a spotlight journal issue on the history of epidemics in the context of COVID-19.  She is currently coordinating a multi-disciplinary project on ‘How epidemics end’.

James Rice is the Walter S. Dickson Professor of History and chair of the History Department at Tufts University. His publications include Nature and History in the Potomac Country: From Hunter-Gatherers to the Age of Jefferson (John Hopkins University Press, 2009), Tales from a Revolution: Bacon’s Rebellion and the Transformation of Early America (Oxford University Press, 2012), and “Bacon’s Rebellion in Indian Country” (winner of the Binkley-Stephenson Award for the best article published in the Journal of American History in 2014). He is currently working on two books: Founding Massacres: Violence, Ambition, and the Birth of Virginia, and Native America: An Environmental History (under contract with the Cambridge University Press).

Cristobal Silva is an associate professor in the Department of English at UCLA, where he specializes in the Literatures of the Colonial Americas. He is the author of Miraculous Plagues: An Epidemiology of Early New England Narrative (Oxford, 2011), which explores the relation between colonial epidemiology and the stories of colonial belonging that English settlers told themselves. He is currently finishing a manuscript titled Republic of Medicine, a study of immunology, medical knowledge, and the eighteenth-century Atlantic slave trade.

Rana Hogarth is associate professor of history at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Her research focuses on the creation of ideas about racial difference in North America and the Caribbean as they emerged through the language of medicine and its allied fields. She is the author of Medicalizing Blackness: Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780-1840 (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), which examines how white physicians defined blackness as a medically significant marker of difference in slave societies of the American Atlantic. Her other publications appear in Social History of Medicine, American Quarterly, African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal, the American Journal of Public Health and in the edited volume Medicine and Healing in the Age of Slavery, edited by Sean Morey Smith and Christopher Willoughby (LSU Press, 2021).

Seth Archer is an assistant professor at Utah State University. He is a cultural and environmental historian of North America specializing in Native American and Indigenous history and the history of health, disease, and medicine. His first book is Sharks upon the Land: Colonialism, Indigenous Health, and Culture in Hawaiʻi, 1778–1855, which won the President’s Book Award from the Social Science History Association. From 2015 to 2017 he was the Mellon Research Fellow in American History at the University of Cambridge. His current research involves vaccination efforts by the US government and Hudson’s Bay Company in Indian Country in the 1830s.

About the organizers

Claire Gherini is an assistant professor of history at Fordham University. Her work examines slavery and medical knowledge-making in the eighteenth-century British Caribbean.

Ryan Amir Kashanipour (he/él) is an interdisciplinary scholar of medicine and science in Latin America and the early modern Atlantic world. He an Assistant Professor of History and Latin American Studies at the University of Arizona. His research examines the intersections of experience and epistemology in the production of knowledge and institutions of colonial authority related to disease, health, and the body. His first book, Between Magic and Medicine: Colonial Yucatec Healing in the Spanish Atlantic World, in development with the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture, explores the formation of robust indigenous Maya and inter-ethnic social and intellectual networks of sickness and healing during the recurring epidemic and ecological crises of colonial Yucatán. He also has particular research and teaching interests in food history and co-edits the Recipes Project, an interdisciplinary digital community dedicated to historical recipes of all sorts, medical, magical, and culinary. His research has been supported by grants and fellowships from the Kluge Center at Library of Congress, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Mellon Foundation, National Endowment from the Humanities, and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. He is editor of several book series related to the interdisciplinary study of colonial Latin America and the early Americas, including “New Colonial Histories of Latin America” with Routledge Press.

Contagious Connections, session 1

Co-chaired by Ryan Kashnanipour (University of Arizona) and Claire Gherini (Fordham University), “Contagious Connections” looks at epidemics and disease in Vast Early America.

Epidemics were a foundational force in the early history of the Americas and the larger Atlantic World. Yet their interdisciplinary and comparative analysis has often been restricted by the imperial and temporal priorities of these regions’ subfields as well as older biomedical and demographic approaches to the study of disease. Rather than rehashing whether acquired immunity destined Native Americans to extirpation and Africans for slavery in the Americas, this series proceeds from the idea that epidemics are epistemological and ontological forces: they have a historical materiality but become epidemics of a particular disease when historical actors collectively decide to name and treat them as such.

Join the Omohundro Institute for a pair of (online) conversations with established scholars about the history of epidemics and disease in early America on Friday, December 3, 2021, from 11:30 am to 1:00 pm ET and Friday, December 17, 2021, from 12:30 to 2:00 pm ET.

The December 3 program will include Pablo Gomez, Paul Kelton, Mark Goldberg, Martha Few, Erik Seeman, and Philippa Koch.

The December 17 program will include Erica Charters, James Rice, Cristobal Silva, Rana Hogarth, and Seth Archer.

About the December 3 panel

Pablo F. Gómez is associate professor in the Department of Medical History and Bioethics, and the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is interested in histories of knowledge-making, and health and corporeality in the early modern Atlantic world, with a particular focus on the histories of Latin America, the Caribbean, and the African diaspora. He has been the recipient of multiple grants, most recently a H.I. Romnes Fellowship and a Mellon Foundation Sawyer seminar award. His first book, The Experiential Caribbean, won the 2019 Welch Medal, the 2018 Albert J. Raboteau Book Prize and the Honorable mention for the 2018 Herbert E. Bolton prize. He has also published articles, chapters and reference pieces in multiple languages. Gómez is currently working on a history of the quantifiable body emerging in slave trading circuits in the sixteenth and seventeenth century. He is also collaborating in several projects largely related to global histories of science and Medicine and histories of health and bodies in the Caribbean Latin America.

Paul Kelton is professor and Gardiner Chair in American History at Stony Brook University. He researches the Indigenous peoples of North America, environment and medicine, and early American history. He has examined the biological processes involved in the European takeover of the Americas in two books, Epidemics and Enslavement and Cherokee Medicine, Colonial Germs. By placing local struggles with epidemics within the large-scale context of colonialism’s social disruption, structural violence, and political upheaval, his historical research has contemporary relevance to debates over global health disparities and emerging infectious diseases. He is continuing his research on Indigenous experiences with European-introduced diseases with multiple ongoing projects detailing the contours of Native death and survival during the Seven Years War in North America, the American Revolution, and Indian Removal.

Mark A. Goldberg is an associate professor of History at the University of Houston.  His research focuses on US Latinx history, borders, and immigration.  His book, Conquering Sickness: Race, Health, and Colonization in the Texas Borderlands (Univ. of Nebraska Press, 2017), examines the role of health in imperial expansion, nation building, and race formation in the Texas-Mexico border region.  He is currently working on another book project on the history of Cuban Jewish migration, which offers a new perspective on the relationship between race and immigration.

Martha Few is professor of History and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State University. She is editor of the Hispanic American Historical Review. Her research concentrates on the histories of Indigenous peoples during Spanish colonial rule in Guatemala, Central America, and southern Mexico through the lenses of medicine and public health, gender and sexuality, and environmental history. Professor Few’s recent books include For All of Humanity: Mesoamerican and Colonial Medicine in Enlightenment Guatemala, and Baptism Through Incision: The Postmortem Cesarean in the Spanish Empire (2020), co-authored with Zeb Tortorici and Adam Warren, which was awarded the 2021Teaching Edition Award by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender. She is currently the Audrey Lumsden-Kouvel Long-Term Fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

Erik R. Seeman is professor and chair in the History Department of the University at Buffalo (SUNY).  A historian of religion in early America and the Atlantic world, he is the author of four books and numerous articles. His most recent book, Speaking with the Dead in Early America, won the 2020 Lawrence W. Levine Award from the Organization of American Historians for the best book of American cultural history.  His current book project is “Boston’s Pox of 1721: A People’s History.”

Philippa Koch is assistant professor of Religious Studies at Missouri State University. Her research and teaching center on religion, health, and society in early America and its global context. Her first book, The Course of God’s Providence: Religion, Health, and the Body in Early America (NYU 2021), considers how eighteenth-century Christians perceived sickness and health in an era of rapid changes in medicine and science. Her writing has also appeared in Religions, Church History, and The Atlantic. Her next project, “Cartographies of Motherhood: Defining Women in Colonial Medicine and Missions,” explores how visions of womanhood shifted with developments in maternal medicine, colonial encounters, and global missions.

About the organizers

Claire Gherini is an assistant professor of history at Fordham University. Her work examines slavery and medical knowledge-making in the eighteenth-century British Caribbean.

Ryan Amir Kashanipour (he/él) is an interdisciplinary scholar of medicine and science in Latin America and the early modern Atlantic world. He an Assistant Professor of History and Latin American Studies at the University of Arizona. His research examines the intersections of experience and epistemology in the production of knowledge and institutions of colonial authority related to disease, health, and the body. His first book, Between Magic and Medicine: Colonial Yucatec Healing in the Spanish Atlantic World, in development with the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture, explores the formation of robust indigenous Maya and inter-ethnic social and intellectual networks of sickness and healing during the recurring epidemic and ecological crises of colonial Yucatán. He also has particular research and teaching interests in food history and co-edits the Recipes Project, an interdisciplinary digital community dedicated to historical recipes of all sorts, medical, magical, and culinary. His research has been supported by grants and fellowships from the Kluge Center at Library of Congress, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Mellon Foundation, National Endowment from the Humanities, and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. He is editor of several book series related to the interdisciplinary study of colonial Latin America and the early Americas, including “New Colonial Histories of Latin America” with Routledge Press.

 

Global Georgians: Transnational Interactions with the British Monarchy

This event will begin at 4:30 pm (16:30) London time, 11:30 am New York time.

New link for today’s event! Join us here: https://cwm.zoom.us/j/95564629851 

The Georgian Papers Programme (GPP) invites you to join us for a roundtable discussion about transnational interactions between the British monarchy and leader and peoples from around the globe.

This event builds on David Armitage’s time as the 2019 Sons of the American Revolution Visiting Professor at King’s College London. During his time with the GPP, Professor Armitage studied George III and the Law of Nations and our discussion will explore some of the insights from this project to understand more about connections between the British monarchy and the world outside of Europe. Three panelists will share short papers about their research into different parts of the world during, or just after, the reign of the Georgian monarchs. Charles Prior (University of Hull) will speak about ongoing research into the relationship between the British crown and Native American polities. Priya Atwal (University of Oxford) will discuss how royal blood framed Queen Victoria’s relations with Indian rulers and European princes in the mid-nineteenth century. And Henrietta Harrison (University of Oxford) will discuss work on British interactions with the Qing dynasty in China, particularly the role of translators, officials, and the Macartney mission.

 

After hearing from the panellists, Professor Armitage will share his response to the papers and then we will open the event up to questions, comments, and discussion from the audience. We hope you are able to join us.

 

Charles Prior is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of Hull, where he co-leads the research group Treatied Spaces. Among its projects is the AHRC-funded Brightening the Covenant Chain, which is concerned with diplomacy between the Haudenosaunee and the British Crown; the GPP is a significant contributing partner to this project. His latest publication is Settlers in Indian Country.

 

Henrietta Harrison is Professor of Modern Chinese Studies in the Faculty of Oriental Studies at the University of Oxford and Stanley Ho Tutorial Fellow in Chinese History at Pembroke College.  She is a Fellow of the British Academy. Before coming to Oxford she taught in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Leeds, and in the Department of History at Harvard University.  Her books include The Perils of Interpreting: The Extraordinary Lives of Two Translators between Qing China and the British Empire (Princeton University Press, forthcoming), The Man Awakened from Dreams: One Man’s Life in a North China Village 1857-1942 (Stanford University Press, 2005) and The Missionary’s Curse and Other Tales from a Chinese Catholic Village (University of California Press, 2013).

 

Priya Atwal is Community History Fellow at the University of Oxford. Her academic work specialises in the history of empire, monarchy and cultural politics across modern Britain and South Asia. Royals and Rebels: The Rise and Fall of the Sikh Empire is her first book, published in 2020. Her research has been featured in collaborative projects with Historic Royal Palaces, among others; and she makes regular broadcast appearances, most recently presenting the BBC Radio 4 series, Lies My Teacher Told Me. She tweets @priyaatwal.

David Armitage is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University and an Affiliated Faculty Member at Harvard Law School. He is also an Honorary Professor of History at both the University of Sydney and Queen’s University Belfast and an Honorary Fellow of St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge. He is the author or editor of eighteen books, among them The Ideological Origins of the British Empire (2000), The Declaration of Independence: A Global History (2007), Foundations of Modern International Thought (2013), The History Manifesto (2014, co-auth.), and Civil Wars: A History in Ideas (2017). He has held fellowships and visiting positions in Australia, Britain, China, France, Germany, South Korea, and the United States, and in 2019, he was the Sons of the American Revolution Visiting Professor at King’s College London in association with the Georgian Papers Programme and the Royal Archives.

 

WMQ-HAHR Workshop

This event is by invitation only. For more information, contact oieahc@wm.edu.

Friday March 26: Part I of Workshop

8:30-8:40
Welcome, Opening Remarks from Josh Piker and Martha Few

8:45-9:30
Session 1:

Margaret Newell — “’The Rising of the Indians’; Or, the Indians’ Revolution of [16]’76”

Respondent: Laura Matthew

9:30-9:45
Break

9:45-10:30
Session 2

Matthew Childs — “The Routes of Black Christian Creolization over Africanizing the Roots of the Religious Beliefs of the Enslaved”

Respondent: Leo Garafalo

10:30-10:45
Break

10:45-11:30
Session 3

Alex Hidalgo — “Echo of Voices after the Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Respondent: Céline Carayon

11:30-12:15
Lunch Break

12:15-1:00
Session 4

Casey Schmitt — “’Those who want to plant a colony, must not let any sailors among them’: Traffickers and Colonization in the Lesser Antilles, ca. 1560-1640”

Respondent: Jack Bouchard

1:00-1:15
Break

1:15-2:00
Session 5

Nancy van Deusen — “’In the Tethered Shadow’: Native American Slavery, African Slavery, and the Disappearance of the Past”

Respondent: Matthew Childs

2:00
Final Remarks and End Part I.

Friday April 2: Part II of workshop

8:30-8:40
Welcome, Opening Remarks from Josh Piker and Martha Few

8:45-9:30
Session 1

Céline Carayon — “Forsaken not Forgotten: Transnational Failures and Indigenous Memory in the Early Circum-Caribbean”

Respondent: Alex Hidalgo

9:30-9:45
Break

9:45-10:30
Session 2

Joaquín Rivaya-Martínez — “The Unsteady Comanchería: A Reexamination of Indigenous Power in the Eighteenth-Century Greater Southwest”

Respondent: Margaret Newell

10:30-10:45
Break

10:45-11:30
Session 3

Jack Bouchard — “Before Bacalao: Newfoundland and the Caribbean in the Sixteenth Century”

Respondent: Casey Schmitt

11:30-12:15
Lunch Break

12:15-1:00
Session 4

Laura Matthew — “Two Bigamists in Tehuantepec: Globalized Itineraries in Southern Mesoamerica, c. 1600”

Respondent: Joaquín Rivaya-Martínez

1:00-1:15
Break

1:15-2:00
Session 5

Leo Garafalo — “Negotiating Freedom and Bondage: The Charter Generations of Enslaved and Freed Asians, 1565-1680”

Respondent: Nancy van Deusen

2:00-2:15
Break

2:15-3:15
Summative Session Led By Camilla Townsend. Feel free to consume coffee, snacks, etc. on camera as we work our way through this final session!

 

 

WMQ-HAHR Workshop

This event is by invitation only. For more information, contact oieahc@wm.edu.

Friday March 26: Part I of Workshop

8:30-8:40
Welcome, Opening Remarks from Josh Piker and Martha Few

8:45-9:30
Session 1:

Margaret Newell — “’The Rising of the Indians’; Or, the Indians’ Revolution of [16]’76”

Respondent: Laura Matthew

9:30-9:45
Break

9:45-10:30
Session 2

Matthew Childs — “The Routes of Black Christian Creolization over Africanizing the Roots of the Religious Beliefs of the Enslaved”

Respondent: Leo Garafalo

10:30-10:45
Break

10:45-11:30
Session 3

Alex Hidalgo — “Echo of Voices after the Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Respondent: Céline Carayon

11:30-12:15
Lunch Break

12:15-1:00
Session 4

Casey Schmitt — “’Those who want to plant a colony, must not let any sailors among them’: Traffickers and Colonization in the Lesser Antilles, ca. 1560-1640”

Respondent: Jack Bouchard

1:00-1:15
Break

1:15-2:00
Session 5

Nancy van Deusen — “’In the Tethered Shadow’: Native American Slavery, African Slavery, and the Disappearance of the Past”

Respondent: Matthew Childs

2:00
Final Remarks and End Part I.

Friday April 2: Part II of workshop

8:30-8:40
Welcome, Opening Remarks from Josh Piker and Martha Few

8:45-9:30
Session 1

Céline Carayon — “Forsaken not Forgotten: Transnational Failures and Indigenous Memory in the Early Circum-Caribbean”

Respondent: Alex Hidalgo

9:30-9:45
Break

9:45-10:30
Session 2

Joaquín Rivaya-Martínez — “The Unsteady Comanchería: A Reexamination of Indigenous Power in the Eighteenth-Century Greater Southwest”

Respondent: Margaret Newell

10:30-10:45
Break

10:45-11:30
Session 3

Jack Bouchard — “Before Bacalao: Newfoundland and the Caribbean in the Sixteenth Century”

Respondent: Casey Schmitt

11:30-12:15
Lunch Break

12:15-1:00
Session 4

Laura Matthew — “Two Bigamists in Tehuantepec: Globalized Itineraries in Southern Mesoamerica, c. 1600”

Respondent: Joaquín Rivaya-Martínez

1:00-1:15
Break

1:15-2:00
Session 5

Leo Garafalo — “Negotiating Freedom and Bondage: The Charter Generations of Enslaved and Freed Asians, 1565-1680”

Respondent: Nancy van Deusen

2:00-2:15
Break

2:15-3:15
Summative Session Led By Camilla Townsend. Feel free to consume coffee, snacks, etc. on camera as we work our way through this final session!

 

 

12th Rio de la Plata Workshop

A Book Slam Celebrating Six New Books with Their Authors

 

Watch the videos of each day’s conversation here:

Friday, February 26

Saturday, February 27

Friday, February 26, 2021

3:00 pm EST

  • Colonial Kinship: Guaraní, Spaniards, and Africans in Paraguay–  Shawn Austin
  • A Silver River in a Silver World Dutch Trade in the Rio de la Plata, 1648–1678 –David Freeman
  • Where Caciques and Mapmakers Met Border Making in Eighteenth-Century South AmericaJeffrey Erbig Jr.

Interviewer: Viviana Grieco

Host: Fabrício Prado

Saturday, February 27, 2021

12:00 noon EST

  • Hiding in Plain Sight: Black Women, the Law, and the Making of a White Argentine Republic –Erika Edwards
  • A Woman, a Man, a Nation: Mariquita Sánchez, Juan Manuel de Rosas, and the Beginnings of Argentina –Jeffrey Shumway
  • Staging Frontiers: The Making of Modern Popular Culture in Argentina and Uruguay –William Acree Jr.

Interviewer: Alex Borucki

Host: Fabrício Prado

For questions email Fabrício Prado (fpprado@wm.edu)